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Author: Bill Bynum

Bill Bynum, President of Surgical Services, has over 23 years of experience in healthcare services and more than 10 years in healthcare sales. He is responsible for delivery and support of SpecialtyCare’s non-perfusion autotransfusion, surgical assist, minimally invasive surgical support, and sterile processing consulting services. Most recently, Bill served as Vice President of Surgical Services Development, providing strategic support and guidance for clinical operations and customer relations. Previously, he directed sales and operations for the company’s minimally invasive surgical support and sterile processing management and consulting services nationwide. Prior to joining SpecialtyCare, Bill held several senior management and corporate positions with SSI, where he began his clinical career as an endoscopic technician and spent three years managing a Sterile Processing Department for a large Central Florida hospital and trauma center. Bill earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration from the University of Florida.

Conquering Complexity: An MISS Implementation

miss implementation

Those of us who work in healthcare understand the importance of structured processes and clear communication during a patient handoff. Discontinuity puts the patient at risk and increases the likelihood of medical errors. As an outsourced OR services provider, a handoff takes on another meaning for us at SpecialtyCare—the transfer of an entire service without interrupting hospital operations or compromising patient care.

Improving Your Sterile Processing Department Starts with Focusing on the Fundamentals

TRACKING AND TACKLING THE NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA OUTBREAK

Excellence in sterile processing management is fundamental to a well-run operating room. It supports on-time starts, surgeon satisfaction, and overall efficiency—all of which translate to financial results. But, most importantly, effective sterile processing management reduces the occurrence of healthcare-acquired infections (HAIs), which can significantly harm the patients entrusted to your care.