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Tag: Perfusion

One Man, Two Meaningful and Impressive Careers

Richard Lawson

When Richard Lawson talks with young people about their future, he sometimes suggests a stint in the military. Other times he suggests a career in the medical field. And sometimes, he suggests both. These are not just casual recommendations—he speaks from experience. Technical Sergeant Lawson is a military veteran and a member of the Kentucky Air National Guard. He is also a SpecialtyCare perfusionist. His discipline and dedication over the years has resulted in not just one, but two, meaningful and impressive careers.

Replenishing Reserves: Engaging the Passionate Healthcare Professional

Engaging the Passionate Healthcare Professional

Building a highly talented clinical workforce is imperative for providing the best possible patient outcomes. We know, however, that the most passionate and effective healthcare professionals offer much more than clinical competence and they look for value in their work that extends beyond excellence in clinical care. They look for the intangibles and meaningful connections that prompted them to choose healthcare as a profession in the first place. Our goal is to sustain a culture where our people can thrive and find satisfaction, both personally and professionally.

Tracking and Tackling the Nontuberculous Mycobacteria Outbreak

TRACKING AND TACKLING THE NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIA OUTBREAK

The source of nosocomial infections can be elusive. For investigators, infections stemming from slow-growing bacteria are particularly difficult to identify and combat when symptoms do not present for months, or sometimes even years, after exposure. Add to these challenges the severity of potentially deadly infections and a bacterial outbreak can have devastating consequences. Such is the case with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM).

Goal-Directed Perfusion Methodology for Determining Oxygenator Performance During Clinical CPB

Determining Oxygenator Performance During Clinical CPB

At the 37th Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Cardiovascular Perfusion (AACP), we presented research that used goal-directed perfusion methodology to determine oxygenator performance during clinical cardiopulmonary bypass. The study evaluates three oxygenators currently in clinical use and reflects how information collected by perfusionists could be utilized to provide new information to bridge gaps in knowledge when an absence of quality data is encountered.

The Obesity Paradox, Heart Surgery, and Blood Transfusion

The Obesity Paradox, Heart Surgery, and Blood Transfusion

Historically, there has not been a great understanding about the “obesity paradox,” which suggests that overweight and obese patients may have better outcomes than normal weight patients. Our newly published research confirms that while overweight and mildly obese patients do experience less blood transfusion and post-surgical bleeding than patients of normal weight, much of the observed reduction in transfusion rates in obese patients can be accounted for by other known confounds.

Best Practices in Team Collaboration and Infection Control

BEST PRACTICES IN TEAM COLLABORATION AND INFECTION CONTROL

When I learned of a concern regarding Nontuberculous Mycobacteria (NTM) infections from use of LivaNova’s (previously Sorin) 3T heater-coolers and a change in their Instructions for Use (IFUs), I brought it to the attention of my OR Director at Memorial Medical Center. The situation has led to the development of best practices in team collaboration and infection control.

It Doesn’t Make Sense for Me to Replace My Own Roof

Part 2 in our series on OR Efficiency.

There’s good reason why I don’t roof my own house or fly my own plane. I rely on others for their specialized skills, experience, and economies of scale—knowledgeable people focused on specific activities that ensure quality and safety, keep costs in check, and know the codes and regulations that must be followed. Today, more than ever, we rely on specialization to get things done. Healthcare is no different. In fact, healthcare may be one of our best examples of an industry that can benefit significantly from specialized teams.

We Are Running Out of Perfusionists. And That’s A Problem We Need to Address

Perfusionist shortage

One of the most significant trends facing our industry today is the severe shortage of perfusionists. A current sample of 10% of active perfusionists found that nearly 50% are over 50 years old, and in 2015 there were almost 30% fewer new graduates entering the field than professionals leaving the field. This rate of decline cannot be sustained for long before the deficit poses serious risks to the 350,000 patients who need heart surgeries and perfusion services each year.